Powwow

Native American Attraction Trail

South Dakota is rich in Native American history and culture.

Each region of the state is home to different tribes, and each has its own unique story to tell.

Sioux Falls

Begin in South Dakota’s largest city, located at the junction of Interstates 29 and 90 and home to the state’s largest airport. 

Good Earth State Park
Good Earth State Park
Falls Park
Falls Park
Must-See Stops:

Good Earth State Park at Blood Run
This park is one of the oldest sites of long-term human habitation in the United States. The most recent addition the state park system, Good Earth offers opportunities for birding and hiking as well as the chance to learn some fascinating facts at the visitor center.

Center for Western Studies
The center contains an extensive art and artifact collection with a permanent exhibit on Native American history.

Falls Park 
Named for the Sioux Tribe of American Indians and the waterfalls of the Big Sioux River, scenic Falls Park encompasses 123 acres and is located in city’s historic downtown area. 
 

Downtown Sioux Falls
Travel Planner Tip:

Take time to enjoy the Arc of Dreams, a massive, seven-story-high, permanent stainless streel sculpture that stretches nearly the length of a football field and arcs over the Big Sioux River in downtown Sioux Falls. 

Mitchell

Head west via Interstate 90 (1 hour/70 miles) to Mitchell, home of the World’s Only Corn Palace. The American icon is decorated annually with seven murals made from 12 different colors of corn and native grasses. 

Archeodome
Native American Archeodome
Dakota Discovery Museum
Dakota Discovery Museum
Must-See Stops:

Mitchell Prehistoric Indian Village
The site of a 1,000-year-old Native American village is the only archaeological site in South Dakota open to the public. Guests can watch as archaeologists uncover artifacts in the comfort of the Thomsen Center Archeodome before touring the Boehnen Memorial Museum to see a reconstructed lodge and many of the 1.5 million artifacts. 

Dakota Discovery Museum
Explore numerous historic artifacts from a time when the way of life came from living off the land itself. 
 

Corn Palace
Travel Planner Tip:

Make sure to grab a popcorn ball from the Corn Palace as a snack for the road!

Chamberlain/Oacoma

Continue another hour west on Interstate 90 until you reach the beautiful Missouri River valley and arrive in Chamberlain/ Oacoma. 

Lakota Museum
Exhibit at Lakota Museum
Dignity: of Earth and Fire
Dignity: of Earth and Fire
Must-See Stops:

Akta Lakota Museum & Cultural Center
This museum provides visitors with a living lesson on the Native American way of life both past and present. Visitors benefit from a mini-theater, interactive displays, English-Lakota descriptions, an outdoor Medicine Wheel Garden and a gift shop featuring a unique selection of Native American-made products.

Dignity: of Earth and Sky
This stainless steel, 50-foot-tall statue of a Native American woman was specifically designed to honor the cultures of the Lakota and Dakota people.
 

Powwow
Travel Planner Tip:

St Joe’s Indian School hosts a large powwow every September. 

Pierre & Fort Pierre

Located near beautiful Lake Oahe, Pierre is the state capital of South Dakota. 

Cultural Heritage Center
Exhibit at the Cultural Heritage Center
Must-See Stops:

Cultural Heritage Center
The official museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society tells the story of the state’s history, from pre-statehood to present day.
 

Casey Tibbs Rodeo
Travel Planner Tip:

Fort Pierre is home to the Casey Tibbs Rodeo Center. The museum features memorabilia from nine-time world champion Casey Tibbs and other rodeo greats. 

Wall

Continue west on Interstate 90 until you reach Wall. There you’ll find Wall Drug, a 76,000-square-foot wonderland of free attractions, shopping, photo opportunities, western art and more! 

Badlands
Badlands National Park
woundedkneemuseum
Wounded Knee Museum
Must-See Stops:

Badlands National Park
A maze of buttes and spires, the Badlands were named "mako sica" (meaning "land bad") by the Lakota. Created by millions of years of erosion, Badlands National Park now stretches 244,000 acres with approximately 120,000 acres located on the Pine Ridge Reservation. 

Wounded Knee Museum
The Wounded Knee Museum in Wall tells the story of the events surrounding the Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890.
 

Wall Drug
Planner Tip:

Make sure to grab a donut and some five-cent coffee at Wall Drug. 

Pine Ridge

The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation covers more than 2.8 million acres in southwestern South Dakota, making it the second-largest reservation in the United States and larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined. 

Wounded Knee Memorial
Must-See Stops:

Pine Ridge Visitor Center
The center features Lakota art and wildlife displays as well as travel information.

Wounded Knee Memorial 
Located south of Porcupine on BIA 27, this burial ground is considered sacred. Visitors are reminded to be respectful during their visit.

Red Cloud Indian School and Heritage Center
The Heritage Center is a Native American gift shop, cultural center and fine arts gallery that features one of the most impressive collections of historic and contemporary Native art in the country. 

Oglala Lakota College Historical Center 
The center provides a site for higher education on the reservation. The accredited college stocks a variety of Native American literature in the bookstore. Visitors can see historical photographs and artwork displays.
 

Plains Scenic View
Travel Planner Tip:

Take scenic Highway 44 from Pine Ridge into Rapid City for a beautiful view of the plains.

Rapid City

The state’s second-largest city is also called the “City of Presidents” because of the life-size bronze sculptures of past American presidents that can be found on downtown street corners. 

Journey Museum
Journey Museum
Prairie Edge Trading Company
Prairie Edge Trading Company
Must-See Stops:

Journey Museum and Learning Center
The museum brings together five major prehistoric and historic collections to tell the complete story of the western Great Plains from the perspective of the Lakota people, the pioneers that shaped history, and the scientists that currently study the area.

Prairie Edge Trading Company and Galleries
The store features feature traditional and contemporary Native American art, crafts and music as well as craft supplies and dried herbs.
 

Fort Hays Old West Town
Travel Planner Tip:

For a hand-clappin‘, toe-tappin’ good time, check out the Fort Hays Old West Town & Dinner Show! 

Sturgis

A small town just off Interstate 90 is famous in the motorcycle world! 

Bear Butte
Bear Butte State Park
Must-See Stops:

Bear Butte State Park
From the 1,200-foot summit of Bear Butte, hikers can see four states. Learn more about this sacred site at the visitor center or take a walk to the summit and gaze at the buffalo grazing below.
 

Sturgis Ally
Travel Planner Tip:

Held every August, the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is one of the largest motorcycle gatherings in the world.

Deadwood

Established with the discovery of gold in 1876, Deadwood is still known today for gunpowder, gold and gambling! 

Tatanka
Tatanka Story of the Bison
Must-See Stops:

Tatanka: Story of the Bison
In addition to a beautiful bronze bison sculpture, Tatanka also features the Northern Plains Peoples Educational Interpretive Center, a Native American gift shop, the Sweetgrass Grill & Snack Bar, and Dances With Wolves movie costumes.
 

Gold Mine
Travel Planner Tip:

Check out the Days of ‘76 Rodeo each July in Deadwood, complete with historic parades and real cowboy action!

Custer

The little town in the southern hills is close to both Custer State Park and Crazy Horse Memorial. 

Must-See Stops:

Crazy Horse Memorial
Located in the heart of the Black Hills of western South Dakota, Crazy Horse Memorial is the world's largest in-progress mountain carving. 
 

Indian Taco
Travel Planner Tip:

Try an Indian taco with authentic flatbread or the bison stew at Laughing Water Restaurant located on the Crazy Horse Memorial campus.